How to tag mp3 files

I have a collection of mp3 files which I have named in the form "ARTIST – TITLE.mp3" and wanted to get them tagged properly.
My first plan was to write a Python script to do so, I tried two Python libraries: pytaglib and eyeD3. pytaglib didn’t install, on Windows you need a Visual Studio C++ compiler installed to make it work, which I don’t have currently. pytaglib was the reason why I tried to deal with ubuntu which confronted me with lots of other problems and finally didn’t buy me anything since pytaglib also didn’t install properly on ubuntu and ran into some other compile issues.
eyeD3 installed but apparenty can not handle modern mp3 tag formats.
I also tried MusicBrainz recommend in this article "How to tag all your audio files in the fastest possible way", but its user interface is weird and didn’t get me my files tagged. And I tried the linux id3tag command mentioned in the same article, again no success, looks like it does not support latest tag formats neither.
Then I bumped into Mp3tag for Windows. Brilliant. It made it a piece of cake to tag my mp3 files through a function ‘filename to tag’ where you can specify some sort of pattern for the filenames you have been using, %Artist% – %Title%.mp3 in my case, and a few clicks later all my files have been tagged properly.
I right away donated 5 bucks to the author of this freeware tool.

Enabling 1366×768 resolution in Windows 10

I have been struggling for a while to set this up: enabling  Display Settings so that they would support the 1366×768 resolution of my TV screen, after I connected my laptop with Windows 10 installed to my TV.1) In Display Settings this resolution simply was not offered.

Until I figured out this setting in Display Settings –> Advanced Display Settings –> Display Adapter Properties –> Monitor:

Removing the check mark from this check box revealed the resolution I was looking for. Apparently Windows didn’t have much of a clue about the connected monitor. OK, I admit, I connected it via a simple VGA cable.

Smiley

1)I gave up on ubuntu, too many things didn’t work out of the box ( like sending laptop to sleep when closing the lid ), too much googling and obscure hacking needed, and then display driver started crashing when laptop woke up later on. I do complain about Windows a lot, but Linux systems can be worse, and with Windows 10 Microsoft made a great move towards good quality.

And again Windows 10 messed with my display driver …

And again today Windows 10 messed with my display driver …

Suddenly my screen turned black and after a couple of seconds my desktop came back, but a little later I realized that the ‘Sleep’ menu entry in the ‘Start’ –> ‘Power’ menu had been gone.

Running powercfg –a as recommended here revealed that the ‘Sleep’ capability had been disabled by my graphics driver. And checking my graphics driver revealed: it once more had been changed to ‘Microsoft Basic Display Adapter’.

I found 341.81-desktop-win10-64bit-international.exe in my download folder downloaded in October last year when this happened, ran it and let it re-install my NVIDIA graphics driver. I had to reboot – problem solved.

Windows10 has been messing with my graphics driver

Last week Windows10 attempted to update the graphics driver on my computer and failed with this error 0x800705b4. When I rebooted my PC over the weekend I noticed that my graphics resolution had gone down and changed it back to my usual resolution.
Then, when playing a browser game, I noticed how slow it was and checked a bit closer my display settings. Apparently my NVIDIA GeForce 9600 GT driver had been replaced by some Microsoft Basic Display Driver; see also this discussion.
I visited NVIDIAs web site for driver downloads ( German site in my case ) and first let it detect my installed graphics hardware. Before that worked okay I had to upgrade my Java. Finally NVIDIA correctly detected my graphics hardware and offered me the correct driver download. Everything back to normal now, after roughly one hour wasted and two reboots.
Dear Microsoft, how about the following: when you fail to upgrade software on my computer, can you please leave it like it was before instead of installing some different software without my permission ?

Windows 10 first experience: start menu not opening

OK, did the upgrade to Windows 10 today.
Took roughly two hours to download and install.
First experience was terrible: start menu not opening, task manager not responding.
I tried this solution for the first problem without success.
Thru my Rainmeter process monitor I noticed that MsMpEng.exe kicked in quiet often with high CPU usage. This opened my eyes that apparently Microsoft Security Essentials is part of Windows 10 !? Since I had Avast Antivirus installed on my system this was a good cause for trouble: two virus scanner competing with each other for disk resources, a great way to slow down the system to almost a halt.
The turnaround then was to de-install Avast Antivirus. After another reboot I finally was able to open the Start menu and use task manager and overall system behaves much smoother now.
The Windows 10 installer should consider this and ensure not two virus scanner will be running in parallel. It should either prompt with information that Microsoft Security Essentials will be available with Windows 10 and offer to de-install any other installed virus scanner, or offer to disable Microsoft Security Essentials if user prefers to stay with his current virus scanner.

Why you need at least two computers these days

At least if your are a Windows user you probably need two computers these days. In the morning after I have turned it on and wanna start working with it my computer usually becomes in-responsive for several minutes while updating the virus scanner, running virus scans and especially when the installer kicks in to install updates.
The disk light goes on and the system is basically freezing. No matter how powerful your computer is, Windows turn it into a slow creature. The disk seems to become the bottleneck while virus scanner and installer read tons of data and other applications almost get no time slice to do anything.
Time to grab a coffee, or use your second computer to get things done, hopefully one with may be Linux installed. I decided to leave my computer alone while it is doing all its morning routine. True multitasking apparently doesn’t work under Windows if a single application or two can force it to be completely under their control.
On my private desktop computer with Windows 7 installed yesterday I changed the settings in Windows Update Center from "Automatic installs" to "Automatic downloads, but prompt me for install". This should allow me to decide when the install actually will run and thus give me as a user the power to first get my things done before letting the computer do its sanitary work. Let’s see how this works out in the future.

( I actually wrote this blog posting on my second computer while waiting for my primary work computer to become usable again Zwinkerndes Smiley )

File permissions may be fouled up on web server …

Sometimes it happens to me that after I have changed a CGI script and FTPed it over to my web server the script won’t run because it has lost its original permission settings, especially it has lost its “executable for all” file permission. The problem is: I can’t define “sometimes” more precisely. Sometimes I have to change the file permission after FTP has finished transferring the file, sometimes not. I can’t spot a pattern nor discover a fix for this. Somehow I got used to this problem and fixing file permissions became a default activity after I have transferred a file over to my web server. I even stopped wondering whether I am the only one having that problem and possibly overlooked some basic thing to avoid this, or whether this is a more common problem.

Today I have been reading this in chapter 15 of the book “Beginning Python: From Novice to Professional, Second Edition” by  Magnus Lie Hetland:

Tip: Sometimes, if you edit a script in Windows and it’s stored on a UNIX disk server (you may be accessing it through Samba or FTP, for example), the file permissions may be fouled up after you’ve made a change to your script. So if your script won’t run, make sure that the permissions are still correct.

It always feels good if you discover that you are not alone with a weird problem you have. Apparently this really seems to be a more common hiccup happening somewhere between Windows and Linux systems. Good to know.