How I installed Teamviewer 12 on Linux Mint 18.2

 

Here is how I installed Teamviewer 12 on Linux Mint 18.2 64bit:
1. Downloaded Debian package from here
2. Located file in Downloads folder, right-click, “Open with GDebi Package Installer”
3. Ran into issue about missing dependency: libdbus library
4. Ran this as recommended elsewhere, didn’t help: sudo apt-get install -f
5. Found this useful discussion thread and basically ran the first two commands recommended, then re-attempted install through package manager successfully.

sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
sudo apt-get update

 

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Project Jupyter

Project Jupyter is an open source project allowing to run Python code in a web browser, focusing to support interactive data science and scientific computing not only for Python but across all programming languages. It is a spin-off from IPython I blogged about here.
Typically you would have to install Jupyter and a full stack of Python packages on your computer and start the Jupyter server to get started.
But there is also an alternative available in the web where you can run IPython notebooks for free: https://try.jupyter.org/
This site does not allow you to save your projects permanently but you can export projects and download and also upload notebooks from your local computer.
IPython notebooks are a great way to get started with Python and learn the language. It makes it easy to run your script in small increments and preserves the state of those increments aka cells. It also nicely integrates output into your workflow including graphical plots created with packages like matplotlib.pyplot, and it comes with some primitive markup language to add documentation to your scripts.
The possibilities are endless with IPython or Jupyter – to learn Python as a language or data analysis techniques.
I was inspired by this video on IBM developerWorks to again get started with this: “Use data science to up your game performance“. And the book “Learning IPython for Interactive Computing and Data Visualization – Second Edition” by Cyrille Rossant is the source where I got this tip from about free Jupyter in the web.

Of course you can also sign up for a trial on IBMs Bluemix and start a IBM Data Science Experience project.

Enigma

I just wiped out Windows XP from my little Asus Eee Netbook and replaced it with an Ubuntu 16.04. Of course the Asus Eee is a weak little laptop but it turns out ubuntu runs quiet nicely on it. A modern Windows was not a good choice IMHO since it is too resource hungry, especially when I look at all the Windows services attempting to scan my mechanical hard disk. Sometimes I think Microsoft has been sponsored by flash drive manufacturer to increase market demand for their products Wink
While exploring available software in the Ubuntu Software store I discovered Enigma, a nice game I started playing right away. I used to play it some years ago and knew it under the name Oxyd. It is a puzzle game in which you control a ball with the mouse and need to find pairing oxyd stones. In some levels you have to control two little white balls and get them into a hole. Other levels are Sokoban like where you have to move stones around.

Enigma comes with tons of levels, many are real challenging !

How to tag mp3 files

I have a collection of mp3 files which I have named in the form "ARTIST – TITLE.mp3" and wanted to get them tagged properly.
My first plan was to write a Python script to do so, I tried two Python libraries: pytaglib and eyeD3. pytaglib didn’t install, on Windows you need a Visual Studio C++ compiler installed to make it work, which I don’t have currently. pytaglib was the reason why I tried to deal with ubuntu which confronted me with lots of other problems and finally didn’t buy me anything since pytaglib also didn’t install properly on ubuntu and ran into some other compile issues.
eyeD3 installed but apparenty can not handle modern mp3 tag formats.
I also tried MusicBrainz recommend in this article "How to tag all your audio files in the fastest possible way", but its user interface is weird and didn’t get me my files tagged. And I tried the linux id3tag command mentioned in the same article, again no success, looks like it does not support latest tag formats neither.
Then I bumped into Mp3tag for Windows. Brilliant. It made it a piece of cake to tag my mp3 files through a function ‘filename to tag’ where you can specify some sort of pattern for the filenames you have been using, %Artist% – %Title%.mp3 in my case, and a few clicks later all my files have been tagged properly.
I right away donated 5 bucks to the author of this freeware tool.

Just discovered: jsconsole.com

Just discovered jsconsole.com, an awesome way to quickly test out some javascript code.

So far I like jsFiddle to test out javascript code in the context of a html page and css styles, or cscript to run some javascript locally in a command prompt window.

jsconsole runs in your browser but works like a console, thus you just type or paste in javascript code and will see the output in the console. Like:

a = 1;
1
b = 3;
3
a + b
4
A nice feature is that you can paste in functions as well and execute those:
function addit(v1,v2) { 
  return v1+v2; 
}
addit(a,b);
4
A much nicer feature is that you can load any web page to make it available as a document in your javascript context:
:load www.google.com

Loading url into DOM…

DOM load complete

You can also use that “:load” command to load any external scripts, or a javascript framework like jquery:

:load http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.0/jquery.min.js

Loading script…

Loaded http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.0/jquery.min.js

Now we have the google page available as a document and jquery as a library we can easily find out ( programmatically ) the text of the two buttons on that page:

$("input").each( function() {if ($(this).attr("type") == "submit") { console.log($(this).attr("value")); }});

"Google Search"

"I’m Feeling Lucky"

Isn’t hat just … wow !?

PimpGoogleBookmarks.js

My latest Greasemonkey / jQuery script PimpGoogleBookmarks.js I wrote to – as the name of that script already says it – pimp Google Bookmarks.

One thing I hate about the Google Bookmarks Screen is the long list of tags on the left ( yep, I do have many tags ) which makes the entire document very long ( high, to be precise ).
My little GM script adjusts the height of the list of tags on the left and the list of search results on the right to my screen size and gives both areas a scroll bar, thus I can scroll down the tags list or the list of search results separately.

In addition it is possible to search for a combination of tags by doing a double-click on those.

Sweet, isn’t it ? Greasemonkey and jQuery are two powerful friends when it comes to tweak web pages to just work a bit better and become more convenient to use.

How to improve readability of some tag soup with Editplus

Today I discovered a simple trick to make very long lines of ( XML or HTML ) tags more readable using Editplus.

Here we go:

Note that the “Regular expression” feature needs to be turned on for this to work. This will add a newline to each tag closing bracket and thus convert long lines of tag soup into multiple lines where each tag has its own line of text.

I tried to achieve the same with Notepad++ but failed so far.